Monday, May 28, 2007

Relais de l'Entrecote Secret Sauce Recipe



Amazing what you can find on the internet with a little digging... Now , if I could only find the correct measures...

"Le Relais de Venise instead served the dish with a complex butter-based sauce containing tarragon, marjoram, dill, rosemary, thyme, basil, paprika, anchovies, and numerous other condiments and spices"

25 comments:

Chrisos said...

But the meat they serve is not entrecôte!

Adrian said...

!

Chrisos said...

it's faux filet!
The real entrecote is too fat and many people (supposedly people who try to eat healthy food) don't like this kind of meat!

Chroniques du Plaisir said...

"and numerous other condiments and spices"... it's not quite comprehensive this ingredients list... ;-)

Adrian said...

Well, it's the best list I've seen so far.... I'll ask Madame Burrous one day when she asks me for theatre tickets again..

David said...

I'd like to know how those sleek servers wear those sexy shoes all day.

oh-la-la!

Adrian said...

Only some of them are sleek , big boy, incidentally they are the best paid servers in the city, believe it or not...

margaret said...

I have long wondered why anyone would want to learn the recipe for this sauce. Certainly a proper bearnaise rivals it and offers the same texture and taste family.

Chrisos said...

Béarnaise is great, but it has nothing to do with the entrecôte sauce!

Adrian said...

Béarnaise has neither the same texture nor taste nor context.

Anonymous said...

An article in Le Monde on 20 June 2007 says that the key ingredient in the Relais de Venise/Relais de l'Entrecote sauce is chicken livers. However, a piece that appeared in The Independent on 12 July 2007 reports that the owner of the Relais de Venise, Helene Godillot, says that the recipe given in Le Monde isn't accurate. She didn't say the sauce doesn't contain chicken livers, though. (Do websearches on "Relais de Venise" plus "Le Monde" or "The Independent" and you should be able to find the two articles.)
(Presumably aficionados already know this, but just in case you don't, Mme Godillot and Mme Burrus are sisters, their two restaurant chains are identical, and they use exactly the same sauce.)

alain said...

Voir l'article dans le guide lesrestos.com

http://www.lesrestos.com/
onedecouverte~No~2099458564.htm

bon appetit

Georges said...

"Ses ingrédients sont le foie de volaille, le thym frais et la fleur de thym, la crème fleurette, la moutarde blanche, le beurre et l'eau, le sel, le poivre. Ustensiles : une casserole, un mixer, un chinois.

En voici la progression. D'une part, faire blondir doucement les foies de volaille avec du thym frais et les faire légèrement colorer. D'autre part, faire réduire à feu doux la crème liquide (fleurette) avec la moutarde blanche de Dijon et parfumer à la fleur de thym fraîche. Mixer finement les foies de volaille, puis les passer au chinois dans la crème réduite. Attention à l'évolution de la sauce : lorsqu'elle épaissit, incorporer le beurre ferme et un peu d'eau. Rectifier, sel et poivre du moulin. Rien de plus simple, en apparence. Cette recette exige cependant un certain tour de main, c'est-à-dire plus d'application que d'inspiration. Elle doit moins au génie d'un grand cuisinier qu'aux mille inconnus modestes qui, depuis des générations, ont tourné la spatule de bois dans la casserole."

http://www.lemonde.fr/aujourd-hui/article/2007/06/20/le-secret-de-l-entrecote-enfin-devoile_925998_3238.html

Elizabeth Brown said...

I've heard that this recipe is the most accurate. I'll be trying it tonight.

1/4 cup dry white wine, such as Sauvignon Blanc
2 tablespoons minced shallots
4 anchovy fillets, chopped
1/4 cup low-sodium beef broth or homemade chicken broth
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
1 tablespoon chopped fresh chervil

Either using the pan the steaks were cooked in, or another pan:
Add the wine to pan (and deglaze, if necessary, stirring up the brown bits). Add the broth, shallots, anchovies, and cook until the liquid reduces to a glaze. Remove from heat, whisk in the butter 1 T. at a time, then add the herbs.

Adrian said...

wow, beautiful, smart and a cook of forbidden recipes...what leads you to my wretched blog?

Adrian said...

You're really cheap then, aren't you?

Anonymous said...

I'm assuming nobody has been able to crack the code but somebody is making the sauce somewhere. what price would you put on it?

Wine11 said...

Im sure it has Dijon mustard in it

Chicago Jeff said...

No question, there is Mustard in it. perhaps if we combine the recipe of Georges and Elizabeth

Anonymous said...

If you cant taste the anjovis in it, you should not write anything in here... for obvious reasons.

Anonymous said...

Well I ate there 2 days ago and I could definitely taste a lot of butter and also tarragon and mustard. Beyond that I couldn't pick out the other herbs. My palate is usually pretty reliable for what it's worth...

Anonymous said...

I´m prety sure that the sauce contains chicken liver. However, the recipe from Le Monde is not the right one...

PareeDave said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
PareeDave said...

Forget everything else you have seen - this gentleman has got it down. Watch his video demonstration, complete with English subtitles (attention: chervil, which is part of the recipe, is mistranslated as "parsley" by the well-intentioned subtitler. Chef M. Dupagne clearly says parsley is too strong).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUl6OCL1UMg&app=desktop

It is essentially a modified béarnaise influenced by that "Café de Paris" butter cited in the first post (from Wikipedia's entry on the restaurant's history). Dupagne drops the lemon juice his written recipe calls for - you see it among the ingredients, but it falls out of the demo (which he originally added to the mayonnaise base). I've seen calls to add sumac powder instead of lemon juice, and may try that in the herb butter blend, alongside the nutmeg. There are no chicken livers, but anchovies and capers - as someone who's been going to the original restaurant for nearly 40 years, I've always suspected there were capers in there somewhere.

Sevgi Ayar said...
This comment has been removed by the author.